A Mixed Bag of New Released for the Week of August 9th!

by Jessica on August 11, 2015

Everything from Fiction, History and Mystery.
A little something for everyone in the New Releases list for this week!

Hardcover: 

The Race for Paris
(Historical Fiction)
Meg Waite Clayton
$25.99

Opening in Normandy on June 29, 1944, The Race for Paris follows two American female war correspondents on their quest to document (and make) history by covering the Allied liberation of Paris. Jane is a young, single journalist for the Nashville Banner. When she’s assigned to cover a field hospital, she meets Olivia, “Liv,” an Associated Press photographer.

However, unlike their male colleagues, Liv and Jane are constantly confronted by red tape and derision because the military believes women cannot handle the rigors of combat journalism. Jane is resigned to making the most of her assignment, but Liv is determined to get to Paris. After failing to win over her commanding officer, she goes AWOL and seizing her chance to make a name for herself, Jane joins her.

Reluctantly accompanied by Fletcher, a male British military reporter, the two women chase their story through the gunfire, carnage, and death scarring the French countryside. Their journey is further complicated by emotional bonds, romantic tensions, and one woman’s secret a secret with the power to end her career and, perhaps, her life.

Inspired by pioneering World War II journalists such as Margaret Bourke-White and Martha Gellhorn who paved the way for Christiane Amanpour, Marie Colvin, and Lynsey Addario The Race for Paris combines riveting storytelling with deft literary craftsmanship and extensive research in a passionate narrative of women driven to transcend the limitations of their time.

*Join us on 8/18 at 7pm for an evening with Meg Waite Clayton!!*

The Beat Goes On
(Crime)
by Ian Rankin
$26.00

From his beginnings as a young Detective Constable in “Dead and Buried,” right up to his dramatic, but not quite final, retirement in “The Very Last Drop,” Rebus shines in these stories, confirming his status as one of crime fiction’s most compelling, brilliant, and unforgettable characters. In these gripping, fast-paced tales, the legendary Scottish detective investigates the sinister cases that are his specialty, including a gruesome student death, the brutal murder of a woman at the crux of a love triangle, an audacious jewel heist, suspicious happenings at a nursing home, and an ominous email that brings a family’s darkest secrets to light.
THE BEAT GOES ON is the ultimate Ian Rankin treasure trove–a must-have book for crime fiction aficionados and a superb introduction for anyone looking to experience DI John Rebus, and the dark, twist-filled crimes he investigates.

Katrina
(U.S. History)
by Gary Rivlin
$27.00

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana–on August 29, 2005–journalist Gary Rivlin traces the storm’s immediate damage, the city of New Orleans’s efforts to rebuild itself, and the storm’s lasting affects not just on the city’s geography and infrastructure–but on the psychic, racial, and social fabric of one of this nation’s great cities.
Much of New Orleans still sat under water the first time Gary Rivlin glimpsed the city after Hurricane Katrina. Then a staff reporter for “The New York Times,” he was heading into the city to survey the damage. The Interstate was eerily empty. Soldiers in uniform and armed with assault rifles stopped him. Water reached the eaves of houses for as far as the eye could see.

This book traces the stories of New Orleanians of all stripes–politicians and business owners, teachers and bus drivers, poor and wealthy, black and white–as they confront the aftermath of one of the great tragedies of our age and reconstruct, change, and in some cases abandon a city that’s the soul of this nation.

Who Do You Love
(Fiction)
by Jennifer Weiner
$27.00

Rachel Blum and Andy Landis are just eight years old when they meet one night in an ER waiting room. Born with a congenital heart defect, Rachel is a veteran of hospitals, and she’s intrigued by the boy who shows up alone with a broken arm. He tells her his name. She tells him a story. After Andy’s taken back to a doctor and Rachel’s sent back to her bed, they think they’ll never see each other again. Rachel grows up in an affluent Florida suburb, the popular and protected daughter of two doting parents. Andy grows up poor in Philadelphia with a single mom and a rare talent for running.
Yet, over the next three decades, Andy and Rachel will meet again and again–linked by chance, history, and the memory of the first time they met, a night that changed the course of both of their lives.

You’re Never Weird on the Internet
(Biography)
by Felicia Day
$25.99

The Internet isn’t all cat videos. There’s also Felicia Day–violinist, filmmaker, Internet entrepreneur, compulsive gamer, hoagie specialist, and former lonely homeschooled girl who overcame her isolated childhood to become the ruler of a new world…or at least semi-influential in the world of Internet geeks and Goodreads book clubs.
After growing up in the south where she was “homeschooled for hippie reasons,” Felicia moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of becoming an actress and was immediately typecast as a crazy cat-lady secretary. But Felicia’s misadventures in Hollywood led her to produce her own web series, own her own production company, and become an Internet star.
Felicia’s short-ish life and her rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influential creators in new media. Now, Felicia’s strange world is filled with thoughts on creativity, video games, and a dash of mild feminist activism–just like her memoir.

Paperback: 

Beyond the First Draft
(Writing)
by John Casey
$16.95

Through anecdotes about other writers methods and habits (as well as his own) and close readings of literature from Aristotle to Zola, the essays in this collection offer suggestions about things to do, things to think about when your writing has got you lost in the woods. In Dogma and Anti-dogma Casey sets out the tried-and-true advice and then comments on when to apply it and when to ignore it. In What’s Funny he considers the range of comedy from pratfalls to elegant wit. In In Other Words he discusses translations and the surprising effects that translating can have on one’s native language. In Mentors he pays tribute to those who have guided him and other writers. Throughout the fourteen essays there are notes on voice, point of view, structure, and other crucial elements. This book is an invaluable resource for aspiring writers and a revitalizing companion for seasoned ones.

Big Little Lies
(Fiction)
by Liane Moriarty
$16.00

A murder A tragic accident Or just parents behaving badly? What’s indisputable is that someone is dead. Madeline is a force to be reckoned with. She’s funny, biting, and passionate; she remembers everything and forgives no one. Celeste is the kind of beautiful woman who makes the world stop and stare but she is paying a price for the illusion of perfection. New to town, single mom Jane is so young that another mother mistakes her for a nanny. She comes with a mysterious past and a sadness beyond her years. These three women are at different crossroads, but they will all wind up in the same shocking place.

Invisible Bridge
(U.S. History)
by Rick Perlstein
$21.00

In January of 1973 Richard Nixon announced the end of the Vietnam War and prepared for a triumphant second term–until televised Watergate hearings revealed his White House as little better than a mafia den. The next president declared upon Nixon’s resignation “our long national nightmare is over”–but then congressional investigators exposed the CIA for assassinating foreign leaders. The collapse of the South Vietnamese government rendered moot the sacrifice of some 58,000 American lives. The economy was in tatters. And as Americans began thinking about their nation in a new way–as one more nation among nations, no more providential than any other–the pundits declared that from now on successful politicians would be the ones who honored this chastened new national mood.

The Second Machine Age
(Economics)
by Erik Brynjolfsson
$16.95

In The Second Machine Age MIT’s Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee two thinkers at the forefront of their field reveal the forces driving the reinvention of our lives and our economy. As the full impact of digital technologies is felt, we will realize immense bounty in the form of dazzling personal technology, advanced infrastructure, and near-boundless access to the cultural items that enrich our lives.